Spine & Sports Injuries

We are a multidisciplinary practice specializing in sports medicine, pain management, and ortho related injuries. Our comprehensive approach is designed to cure all of your orthopedic injury needs.

Common Injuries

Herniated Disc

A herniated disc (also called bulged, slipped or ruptured) is a fragment of the disc nucleus that is pushed out of the annulus, into the spinal canal through a tear or rupture in the annulus. Discs that become herniated usually are in an early stage of degeneration.

This condition occurs when the soft center of a spinal disc pushes through a crack in the tougher exterior casing.
Some herniated discs cause no symptoms. Others can irritate nearby nerves and result in pain, numbness, or weakness in an arm or leg.
Not every disc needs intervention. When needed, treatment includes medication, physical therapy, and possibly surgery.

Low Back Injury

Most low back pain is the result of an injury, such as muscle sprains or strains due to sudden movements or poor body mechanics while lifting heavy objects. Low back pain can also be the result of certain diseases, such as: cancer of the spinal cord. a ruptured or herniated disc. Most low back pain goes away on its own in two to four weeks. Physical therapy and pain relievers can help. A few cases may require surgery.

Lower back pain can have causes that aren’t due to underlying disease. Examples include overuse such as working out or lifting too much, prolonged sitting and laying down, sleeping in an uncomfortable position, wearing a poorly fitting backpack. There are many causes of chronic lower back pain.

Neck Injury

Neck pain can be a debilitating symptom with the potential of spreading throughout the rest of the body. There are a number of problems that can cause pain in the neck. Irritation of the nerve pathway may also trigger pain in the shoulders and other parts of the body.

Both men and women are equally affected by neck pain, which can range from dull & constant pain to a sudden sharp or stabbing sensation. Neck pain can be triggered by an accident or as a result of overuse. The symptoms can develop overtime and begin to effect the spine.

Common Causes

  • Sprains and strains
  • Disc degeneration
  • Herniated or ruptured discs
  • Radiculopathy
  • Sciatica
  • Spondylolisthesis
  • Injures such as a car accident or sports injury
  • Spinal stenosis
  • Skeletal irregularities
  • Infections

Achilles Tendinitis

Achilles tendinitis is an overuse injury of the Achilles (uh-KILL-eez) tendon, the band of tissue that connects calf muscles at the back of the lower leg to your heel bone. Achilles tendinitis most commonly occurs in runners who have suddenly increased the intensity or duration of their

Achilles tendinitis is typically not related to a specific injury. The problem results from repetitive stress to the tendon. This often happens when we push our bodies to do too much, too soon, but other factors can make it more likely to develop tendinitis, including:

  • Sudden increase in the amount or intensity of exercise activity—for example, increasing the distance you run every day by a few miles without giving your body a chance to adjust to the new distance
  • Tight calf muscles—Having tight calf muscles and suddenly starting an aggressive exercise program can put extra stress on the Achilles tendon
  • Bone spur—Extra bone growth where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel bone can rub against the tendon and cause pain

Degenerative Disc Disease

Degenerative disk disease is when normal changes that take place in the disks of your spine cause pain.

Spinal disks are like shock absorbers between the vertebrae, or bones, of your spine. They help your back stay flexible, so you can bend and twist. As you get older, they can show signs of wear and tear. They begin to break down and may not work as well.

Your spinal disks are made up of a soft inner core and a tough outer wall. The disks change in ways that may cause degenerative disk disease, such as:

Dry out. When you’re born, the disks in your spine are mostly made up of water. As you age, they lose water and get thinner. Flatter disks can’t absorb shocks as well. The water loss also means less cushion or padding between your vertebrae. This can lead to other problems in your spine that may cause pain.

Crack. The stress of everyday movements and minor injuries over the years can cause tiny tears in the outer wall, which contains nerves. Any tears near the nerves can become painful. And if the wall breaks down, the disk’s soft core may push through the cracks. The disk may bulge, or slip out of place, which is called a slipped or herniated disk. It can affect nearby nerves.

 

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